Diary of a River: 8, 9/28

Here I am again combining two days’ of image review into one post. The image of Nanrantsouak is above Skowhegan and what is now known as Norridgewock. The river bends and turns at this point. The Sandy River joins in. It is the spot between the rapids. Below where the Carrabassett River joins in and above where the Sandy River joins in. When I was there in the fall the water was flowing smooth and calm.  A lone flyfisherman was wading in the middle casting his line. The water had dropped low enough from the spring thaw that you could see the course it takes. Like ocean waves depositing rough rocks on one side of the beach and tiny crushed up shells and sediment on the other, the river deposits debris in its own interesting way. Where this spot is along the river there is a deposit of reeds all seemingly broken into equal lengths.

on the Father Rasle Road at the site of the massacre of the people who lived along the river's edge
on the Father Rasle Road at the site of the massacre of the people who lived along the river’s edge

After the dam in Skowhegan and the deep ravine the river created there, the waters smooth out again and the river widens. Once out of the turn at the southern-ish side of Skowhegan, the river makes its way toward Waterville and the next dam. Here in Hinckley we find the Sappi paper mill. The paper mills in Maine used to be owned and operated by people who also lived in the town. They lived and worked there and took care of the mill and they were part of the community. Now the mills are owned by mulitnational conglomerates. Decisions are made in an office somewhere very far away from the operations. I imagine an office in a highrise in Dubai where a man stares at spreadsheets all day and moves numbers around so that the global operations look like they are making a profit for the shareholders. This man looks at the mill and its workers in Hinckley as widgets. And when he needs to trim expenses, he will see this widget as expendable.

Below Skowhegan as the river turns and heads toward Waterville we come to Hinckley. The paper mill is still active there. This image was taken from the riverside beyond a small highbush blueberry farm.
Below Skowhegan as the river turns and heads toward Waterville we come to Hinckley. The paper mill is still active there. This image was taken from the riverside beyond a small highbush blueberry farm.

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